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Effects of different visual environmental conditions on long term motor memory consolidation. Research data of an experiment following the saccadic adaptation paradigm.

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Researchers

Name
Voges, Caroline
Helmchen, Christoph
Heide, Wolfgang
Sprenger, Andreas

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Dataset Information

Title Effects of different visual environmental conditions on long term motor memory consolidation. Research data of an experiment following the saccadic adaptation paradigm.
Original Title Auswirkungen visueller Umgebungsbedingungen auf motorisches Anpassungslernen. Forschungsdaten eines Experiments zur Sakkadenadaptation.
Citation Voges, C., Helmchen, C., Heide, W., & Sprenger, A. (2015). Effects of different visual environmental conditions on long term motor memory consolidation. Research data of an experiment following the saccadic adaptation paradigm. [Translated Title] (Version 1) [Files on CD-ROM]. Trier: Center for Research Data in Psychology: PsychData of the Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information ZPID. https://doi.org/10.5160/psychdata.vsce10aus26
Responsible for Data Collection Andreas Sprenger
Data Collection Completion Date 2010
Dataset Publication 2015
Dataset ID vsce10aus26
Study Description Adaptation of saccade amplitude in response to intra-saccadic target displacement is a type of implicit motor learning which is required to compensate for physiological changes in saccade performance. Once established trials without intra-saccadic target displacement lead to de-adaptation or extinction, which has been attributed either to extra-retinal mechanisms of spatial constancy or to the influence of the stable visual surrounding. Therefore we investigated whether visual deprivation (Ganzfeld-stimulation or sleep) can partially maintain this motor learning compared to free viewing of the natural surroundings. Thirty-five healthy volunteers performed two adaptation blocks of 100 inward adaptation trials interspersed by an extinction block which were followed by a two hours break with or without visual deprivation (VD). Using additional adaptation and extinction blocks short- and long- (4 weeks) term memory of this implicit motor learning were tested. In the short term, motor memory tested immediately after free viewing was superior to adaptation performance after VD. In the long run, however, effects were opposite: motor memory and relearning of adaptation were superior in the VD conditions. This could imply independent mechanisms that underlie the short-term ability of retrieving learned saccadic gain and its long-term consolidation. We suggest that subjects mainly rely on visual cues (i.e. retinal error) in the free viewing condition which makes them prone to changes of the visual stimulus in the extinction block. This indicates the role of a stable visual array for resetting adapted saccade amplitudes. In contrast, visual deprivation (GS and sleep), might train subjects to rely on extra-retinal cues, e.g. efference copy or prediction to remap their internal representations of saccade targets, thus leading to better consolidation of saccadic adaptation.
Hypotheses The objective of the study was to investigate the influence of visual information on the consolidation of adapted saccades. It was to be demonstrated whether (1) free vision in a natural, spatially stable environment - meaning in a constant egocentric visual field - recalibrates the saccadic system and (2) whether visual deprivation or sleep after adaption facilitates its consolidation. For this purpose, the learning curves of the sequence adaption - extinction - adaption were investigated before and after varying visual conditions. Measures for retention, such as an improvement of re-adaption, were of interest. Free vision served as a control condition for two different types of visual deprivation (Ganzfeld-stimulation and sleep). Furthermore, longitudinal effects after 4 weeks were determined.
Keyphrase influence of visual information on adaptation of saccade amplitude, visual deprivation (Ganzfeld-stimulation & sleep) vs free viewing, short & long term memory of implicit motor learning, 35 healthy adults aged 18-30, primary data
Funding German Research Foundation (DFG) (SFB 654)
Rating Metric data level for EEG data and eye movement (Leigh & Zee, 2006)

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PSYNDEX Classification and Controlled Terms

Classification Visual Perception
Neuropsychology & Neurology
Controlled Terms Eye Movements
Sensory Adaptation
Perceptual Motor Learning
Visual Stimulation
Sensory Deprivation
Sleep

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Research Method Description

Research Method Description Experiment Data
Classification of Data Collection Experimental Design, Mixed Design, Laboratory Experiment
Research Instrument The subjects sat in a dark room on a chair at a distance of 1.4 m from a projection screen. During measurement, a chin rest stabilized the subjects head. A red laser dot with a diameter of 0.1 served as the stimulus that the subjects were supposed to follow with their eyes. Eye movements were recorded via video-oculography (Eyelink-II, SR Research Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario, Canada). During trial runs with adaption, the beginning of a gaze jump was recognized online and the gaze target was relocated accordingly.
Data Collection Method Data collection in the presence of an experimenter
- Individual Administration
- Computer-Supported
- Specialized Apparatuses or Measuring Instruments, namely electroencephalography (EEG); electrooculography (EOG), electromyography (EMG), recording of eye movements
Time Points repeated measurements
Survey Time Period The trial with two-hour Ganzfeld-stimulation or normal vision took place between 10 am and 4 pm. After 4 weeks, the subjects were tested in the opposite condition. The sleep condition took place at night.
Characteristics In the experiment with visual deprivation through sleep (N = 16), one subject could not be included in the assessment because of technical problems, i.e. N = 15. For three subjects in the vision vs. Ganzfeld-stimulation condition, the data could also not be analysed. This resulted in a reduced number of subjects (N = 20).
Population Healthy adults aged 18-30 years
Experimental Pool Individuals
Sample Convenience sample
Subject Recruitment recruition via fliers; payment of up to 120,-Euro (depending on time spent on the experiment)
Sample Size Study 1: 23 Indivduals; study 2: 16 individuals
Return/Drop Out Study 1: 3 persons were excluded; study 2: 1 person was excluded.
Gender Distribution Study 1:
55 % female subjects (n=11)
45 % male subjects (n=9)

Study 2:
66,67 % female subjects (n=10)
33,33 % male subjects (n=5)
Age Distribution 18-30 years
Special Groups -
Country Germany
Region Schleswig-Holstein
City Lubeck
Variables Socio-demographic data; motor adaption performance values; sleep parameters

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Data Status

Data Status Complete Data Set
Original Records signal recordings
Transformation Directly recorded in digital data format

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Description of the Provided Data

Description Research data file
File Name vsce10aus26_fd.txt
Data Content 35 subjects, 206 variables
Data Points 35*206=7210 data points
Variables Experimental condition (3), subject number (1), age (1), gender (1), first direction of adaptation (1), direction of adaptation in the second session after 4 weeks (1), dominant eye of subject (1), FIRST RECORDING: median baseline/extinction/postextinction gain (3), saccadic gain derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side (16), saccadic gain derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of post-adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side (16), percentual gain change derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side and the mean baseline gain (16), percentual gain change derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of post-adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side and the mean baseline gain (16), amount of retention after the break/after sleep related to the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade after the break/after sleep derived from the exponential fit (8), mean peak velocity of the adapted side during extinction, post-extinction, adaption 1, resp.2, post-adaption 1, resp. 2, baseline (7), mean baseline gain to the previously adapted, resp. non-adapted side (2), SECOND RECORDING: mean baseline gain (1), mean baseline gain to the previously adapted, resp. non-adapted side (2), median extinction, post-extinction gain to the adapted side (2), saccadic gain derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side (16), saccadic gain derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of post-adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side (16), mean gain during adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the non-adapted side (2), mean gain during post-adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the non-adapted side (2), mean peak velocity of the adapted side during adaptation, post-adaption 1, resp 2 (4), mean peak velocity of the non-adapted side during adaptation, post-adaption 1, resp 2 (4), percentual gain change derived from the mean gain to the adapted side during post-extinction, extinction and the mean baseline gain in the first recording (2), percentual gain change derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side and the mean baseline gain (16), percentual gain change derived from the exponential fit at the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of post-adaptation 1, resp. 2 to the adapted side and the mean baseline gain (16), amount of retention after the break/after sleep related to the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade of post-adaptation 2 derived from the exponential fit (8), amount of retention after the break/after sleep related to the 1st,3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th, end saccade after the break/after sleep derived from the exponential fit (8), SLEEP PARAMETERS: sleep latency (1), -duration (1), minutes awake in total (1), percent awake (1), minutes REM in total (1), percent REM (1), minutes sleep stage 1,2,3,4 in total (4), percent sleep stage 1,2,3,4 (4)
MD5 Hash 7285e4ba00a3c42e9c11963724abab84
  

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Description of Additional Materials

Description File Name
English codebook for research data file vsce10aus26_fd.txt vsce10aus26_kb.txt

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Publications Directly Related to the Dataset

Publications Directly Related to the Dataset
Voges, C., Helmchen, C., Heide, W., & Sprenger, A. (2015). Ganzfeld stimulation or sleep enhance long term motor memory consolidation compared to normal viewing in saccadic adaptation paradigm. PLoS ONE, 10 (4), e0123831. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0123831

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Utilized Test Methods

Utilized Test Methods
McLaughlin, S.C. (1967). Parametric adjustment in saccadic eye movements. Perception & Psychophysics, 2 (8), 359-362.

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Further Reading

Further Reading
Leigh, R. J., & Zee, D. S. (2006). The Neurology of Eye Movements. New York: Oxford University Press.
Pelisson, D., Alahyane, N., Panouilleres, M., & Tilikete, C. (2010). Sensorimotor adaptation of saccadic eye movements. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 34, 1103-1120.
Rechtschaffen, A., & Kales, A. (1968). A Manual of Standardized Terminology, Techniques and Scoring System for Sleep Stages of Human Subjects. Washington: Public Health Service, United States Government Printing Office.

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Address

Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information
Universitätsring 15,
Center for Research Data in Psychology
54296 Trier, Germany
Phone: +49 (0)651 201-2062
Fax: +49 (0)651 201-2071


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