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Youth sport study 1995. Primary data.

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Researchers

Name
Kurz, Dietrich
Brinkhoff, Klaus-Peter
Tietjens, Maike
Endrikat, Kirsten

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Dataset Information

Title Youth sport study 1995. Primary data.
Original Title Jugendsportstudie 1995. Primrdaten.
Citation Kurz, D., Brinkhoff, K.-P., Tietjens, M., & Endrikat, K. (2004). Youth sport study 1995. Primary data. [Translated Title] (Version 1) [Files on CD-ROM]. Trier: Center for Research Data in Psychology: PsychData of the Leibniz Institute for Psychology Information ZPID. https://doi.org/10.5160/psychdata.kzdh95ju08
Language of variable documentation German/English
Responsible for Data Collection Kurz, Dietrich; Brinkhoff, Klaus-Peter; Tietjens, Maike; Endrikat, Kirsten; Infratest Burke
Data Collection Completion Date 1995
Dataset Publication 2004
Dataset ID kzdh95ju08
Study Description Investigated the significance and extent of physical activity in adolescence as well as possible correlations between sport activity and identity development. As part of the Jugendsportstudie 1995 (Youth Sport Study 1995) data were collected from a total of 3,426 adolescents in grades 7, 9, 11, and 13. The teenagers surveyed came from Brandenburg (1,770) and from North Rhine-Westphalia (1,656). A questionnaire measured individual sport characteristics (fitness, extent and intensity of physical activity, sporting activity settings, recreational activities, sport performance), conditions surrounding a teenager's sport commitment (peer orientation and relationships, attitudes toward sports and sports clubs, perceptions of the sports instructor/trainer, outside support for the sports-related activity, burden of school, stressful situations), and possible effects of sport (health, consumption of legal and illegal substances, readiness to act violently and violent behavior, self-concept and body concept, locus of control). Results indicate that participating in sports on a regular basis is positively associated with both the perception of athletic capability and central dimensions of the body concept. A young person's body is an important platform for expression and experience. Physical activity has a direct impact on athletic competence and an indirect influence on other self-concepts. The teenager's body concept has a high relevance for his/her self-acceptance in adolescence. Regarding the gender comparison, the findings show that for boys sport is the number one group activity and is the glue that holds their group of friends together. Even girls view sport activity as important, though to a much lesser extent. Girls will usually not join sports clubs, because their desires and goals are served to a lesser extent in the clubs than those of boys.
Primary data, derived data, and specific indices for the evaluation sample are provided. Comprehensive data from the 4,349 survey sample of subjects are also provided.
Hypotheses -
Keyphrase athletic participation & social support & mental health & identity development in adolescence, leisure time & psychosocial development & stress & coping behavior & friendship & peer relations, sports-related vs body-related vs general self-concept, representative sample of 3.426 adolescents, primary data
Funding German Research Foundation
Rating -

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PSYNDEX Classification and Controlled Terms

Classification Psychosocial & Personality Development
Sport Psychology & Leisure
Sports
Controlled Terms Sports
Athletic Participation
Athletic Performance
Adolescent Development
Socialization
Personality Traits
Risk Taking
Human Sex Differences
Data Collection

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Research Method Description

Research Method Description Questionnaire Data
Classification of Data Collection Combined Standardized Survey Instruments (Combination of various standardized sections)
Research Instrument The questionnaire "Youth Sports Study 1995: Free Time, Sports, and Me" was used. A total of 110 questions, the questionnaire included multiple individual items directed at either the total sample or specific subgroups as identified using filter questions. The items were either based on established procedures or developed specifically for the study. Following an explanation and example of the different response formats, the first series of questions were posed:
1) Free time and youth groups (questions 1-16). Topics covered (a) the importance of free time activities (response format: 5-point Likert scale), (b) circle of friends (different response formats), (c) playing a musical instrument, (d) best friend, (e) opinion of youth groups (5-point Likert scale), (f) self-concept (25 items covering achievement, psychosocial self-concept, and general self-concept; answer format: 5-point Likert scale).
2) sports clubs (questions 17-40). Question 17 (sports-club status) presents the first essential filter question of the study by which currently active sports club members and volunteers, formerly active sports club members and volunteers, and those who have never been members of a sports club are directed to different sets of questions. The focus is on currently active sports club members. Questions covering type of sport, frequency of training at the club, training regime, activities and duties at the club, satisfaction with the, club equipment, and questions pertaining to the coach/trainer are posed using various closed-response formats. A final question covers reasons for terminating a club membership.
3) Former sports club membership (questions 41-59). Mostly, the same questions are covered as in section 2 using the past tense.
4) Sports club activities: What is your club involvement? (questions 61, 62). In regards to active and former sports club members, their time, activities, and successes within the club are covered using an open format.
(5) Nonmembers of a sports club (questions 63-69). Questions cover why subjects never joined a club and whether they would ever join a club. Hobbies are also investigated. Answers are given in a mixed format.
(6) Sports activities outside of a club (questions 70-84). All the subjects are asked about recreational and school sports activities. Types of sports, sport partners, sport venues and frequency of free time sport activities are covered. 3 questions cover school sport activities followed by a comparison of school and recreational sports. 19 items measure the significance of sport for moral concepts (response format: 5-point Likert scale). Finally, the family environment in relation to sporting activities is examined.
(7) Personal information (questions 85 to 98). In addition to socio-demographic variables, body concept is measured with the help of 25 items. These items, which are recorded using a 5-point Likert scale, measure (a) acceptance of one's body and its integration into self-experience, (b) striving towards physical attractiveness, (c) physical performance, (d ) physical attractiveness and aesthetics, (e) locus of control: appearance, and (f) locus of control: fitness as well as (g) sports performance competence.
(8) What have you already experienced? (questions 99-110). These questions are mainly used for determine stressors using different scales: (a) psychosocial stressors, (b) complaints and diseases, (d) psychophysiological stress symptoms, (e) use of medication, (f) school/work stressors, (g) health locus of control, (h) family support (i), drug use, and (j) emotional stress symptoms. 2 final questions deal with acts of and attitudes toward violence. Precise information about the individual questions can be found at Endrikat and Tietjens (1999).
Data Collection Method Data collection in the presence of an experimenter
- Group Administration
- Paper and Pencil
Time Points single measurement
Survey Time Period September 1995 - December 1995
Characteristics -
Population German youths in grades 7-13 in both the new and old German states
Experimental Pool Individuals
Sample Cluster Sample
Quota Sample
Subject Recruitment Approval received from respective ministries of education; Letter to the respective schools, teachers, and parents. No special strategies to motivate participation; Data collection conducted by Infratest Burke, Munich.
Sample Size 3,426 individuals
Return/Drop Out The survey sample, which was stratified by state, district, school structure, and grade levels, was reduced to a preplanned sample size. A matched "twin" control's questionnaire answers, selected from the group who were initially culled to reduce the overall sample size, were used instead when a main sample-subject's answer to the key question pertaining to sport club status could not be determined.
Gender Distribution 51,6% female subjects (n=1769)
48,4% male subjects(n=1657)
Age Distribution 11-20 years
Special Groups Youths with different sports club status; East German and West German; different types of schools
Country Germany
Region North Rhein-Westphalia; Brandenburg
City -
Variables Importance of free time activities
Friends
Playing a musical instrument
Best Friend
Opinion about youth groups
Self-concept - achievements
Psychosocial self-concept
General self-concept
Sport club status
Types of sports
Ratio of sport activity to clubs that offer it
Sport club training/coaching operation
Goal of sport club
Satisfaction with the sport club
Club equipment as well as questions about the coach/trainer
Reasons for leaving club
Sport club career
Sporting successes
Reasons for never joining a club
Reasons for a possible entry into a sports club in the future
Hobbies
Recreational sports
Recreational sport partner
Recreational sports centers
Frequency of participation in recreation sports
School sports
Comparison of school vs recreational sports
Significance of sport for personal values
Family environment with regard to sports activities
Socio-demographic variables
Body concept
Psychosocial stress
Ailments and illness
Psychophysiological stress symptoms
Consumption of medicine
Stressors due to school/work
Locus of Control - health
Family support
Drug use
Emotional stress symptoms
Use of violence
Attitudes toward violence

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Data Status

Data Status Complete Data Set
Original Records Questionnaire filled out by either the subject or the experimenter containing closed and/or open answers
Transformation The original records were transferred into the data matrix using simple encoding guidelines. Unanswered data was transferred as text or category. Primary data of the study sample are provided in the data file kzdh95ju08_pd1.txt with the associated code book kzdh95ju08_kb1.txt. The primary data from the survey sample are provided in the data file kzdh95ju08_pd2.txt with the associated code book kzdh95ju08_kb2.txt. Index variables of the study sample combined with the primary data are provided (kzdh95ju08_ad.txt). The corresponding transformation instructions are also provided (kzdh95ju08_aa.txt).

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Description of the Provided Data

Description Primary data of the study sample
File Name kzdh95ju08_pd1.txt
Data Content 3,426 subjects, 647 variables
Data Points 3,426*647=2,216,622 data points
Variables Questionnaire ID Number (1), School ID Number (1), Grade Level (1), Sport Club Status (3), Free Time and Youth Groups (86), Sport Club (81), Former Sport Club (80), Sports and Sport Clubs (30), No Sport-Club Affiliation/Other Hobbies (73), Recreational Sports (124) Socio-Demographic and Personal Information (27), Body Concept (25), Stress Situations (27), Ailments, Illnesses, Medication Use (31), School/Work Stressors (11), Health Locus of Control (4), Family Support (4), Drug Use (5), Emotional Stress Symptoms (14), Use of and Attitudes Toward Violence (14), Geographical Information (5)
MD5 Hash 138bb3e49f2b0e454631d62a3b5384b3
  
Description Primary data of the survey sample
File Name kzdh95ju08_pd2.txt
Data Content 4,349 subjects, 647 variables
Data Points 4,349*647=2,813,803
Variables Questionnaire ID Number (1), School ID Number (1), Grade Level (1), Sport Club Status (3), Free Time and Youth Groups (86), Sport Club (81), Former Sport Club (80), Sports and Sport Clubs (30), No Sport-Club Affiliation/Other Hobbies (73), Recreational Sports (124) Socio-Demographic and Personal Information (27), Body Concept (25), Stress Situations (27), Ailments, Illnesses, Medication Use (31), School/Work Stressors (11), Health Locus of Control (4), Family Support (4), Drug Use (5), Emotional Stress Symptoms (14), Use of and Attitudes Toward Violence (14), Geographical Information (5)
MD5 Hash 331519c50387c205512941f58c25025b
  
Description Primary data and derived variables of the study sample and the survey sample
File Name kzdh95ju08_ad.txt
Data Content 3,426 subjects, 701 variables
Data Points 3,426*701=2,401,626 data points
Variables Questionnaire ID Number (1), School ID Number (1), Grade Level (1), Sport Club Status (3), Free Time and Youth Groups (86), Sport Club (81), Former Sport Club (80), Sports and Sport Clubs (30), No Sport-Club Affiliation/Other Hobbies (73), Recreational Sports (124) Socio-Demographic and Personal Information (27), Body Concept (25), Stress Situations (27), Ailments, Illnesses, Medication Use (31), School/Work Stressors (11), Health Locus of Control (4), Family Support (4), Drug Use (5), Emotional Stress Symptoms (14), Use of and Attitudes Toward Violence (14), Geographical Information (5), Index Variables (54)
MD5 Hash 9fd6c57c42055353a84827b403035fb2
  

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Description of Additional Materials

Description File Name
German codebook of primary data set kzdh95ju08_pd1.txt kzdh95ju08_kb1.txt
German codebook of primary data set kzdh95ju08_pd2.txt kzdh95ju08_kb2.txt
Transformation instructions for data set kzdh95ju08_ad.txt kzdh95ju08_aa.txt

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Publications Directly Related to the Dataset

Publications Directly Related to the Dataset
Endrikat, K. (2001). Jugend, Identitt und sportliches Engagement. Lengerich: Pabst.Datensatz 0155433
Gogoll, A. (2001). Die Bedeutung des Sports in der Gesundheitsentwicklung von Kindern und Jugendlichen. Unverffentlichte Dissertation, Universitt Bielefeld.
Gogoll, A., Kurz, D. & Menze-Sonneck, A. (2003). Sportengagement Jugendlicher in Westdeutschland. In W. Schmidt, I. Hartmann-Tews & W.-D. Brettschneider (Hrsg.), Erster Deutscher Kinder- und Jugendsportbericht (S. 145-165). Schorndorf: Hofmann.
Kurz, D. & Tietjens, M. (2000). Das Sportengagement der Jugendlichen. Ergebnisse einer reprsentativen Studie in Brandenburg und Nordrhein-Westfalen. Sportwissenschaft, 30, 384-407.
Tietjens, M. (2001). Sportliches Engagement und sozialer Rckhalt im Jugendalter. Eine reprsentative Surveystudie in Brandenburg und Nordrhein-Westfalen. Lengerich: Pabst.Datensatz 0146504

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Further Reading

Further Reading
Endrikat, K. & Tietjens, M. (1999). Methodenbericht der Studie "Jugend und Sport in Deutschland 1995" (Bielefelder Beitrge zur Sportwissenschaft, Nr. 24). Bielefeld: Universitt Bielefeld.
Schmidt, W., Hartmann-Tews, I. & Brettschneider, W. D. (Hrsg.). (2003). Erster Deutscher Kinder- und Jugendsportbericht. Schorndorf: Hofmann.

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